Certification & Business

The report ‘The Business Case For Being A Responsible Business’  published in 2011 by The Doughty Centre for Corporate Responsibility at Cranfield University and Business in the Community explores the business case for sustainability in detail. The aim of the report was to articulate succinctly the business case for being a responsible business – a headline synthesis of the arguments being used and the most frequently stated business benefits.

Overall, the research identified over 60 business benefits from the research which, when sorted by relevance and description, was clustered into seven key business benefits from being a responsible business.

  1. Brand value and reputation
  2. Employees and future workforce
  3. Operational effectiveness
  4. Risk reduction and management
  5. Direct financial impact
  6. Organisational growth
  7. Business opportunity

The order of this list represents the frequency with which these benefits were cited from both business examples and academic papers – i.e. Brand value and reputation was most often cited, Business opportunity least often cited. The research identified two further business benefits that have only recently started to emerge and are more prominent in companies that have already started the journey to being a responsible business.

8. Responsible leadership
9. Macro-level sustainable development

 The next Collaborative Learning Series webinar will explore these findings in the context of the world of textile sustainability and explore in detail the role that standards and certification can play in supporting the business case sustainability.

Webinar 5: Certification and Business: The Business Case For Sustainability

On the 11th and 12th December we will be holding a live conversation with Claudia Kersten, Marketing Manager of the Global Organic Textile Standard, joins us to share her knowledge and insight into the emerging opportunity of linking textile sustainability standards (such as GOTS) to support a competitive business strategy.

More About Our Topic Leader

Claudia Kersten, Marketing Manager of the Global Organic Textile Standard, joins us to share her knowledge and insight into the emerging opportunity of linking textile sustainability standards (such as GOTS) to support a competitive business strategy.

Claudia studied business administration at Koblenz/Germany based Public and Business Administration Academy,  and Sustainability Management (MBA) at Leuphana University in Lüneburg, Germany. In her Master Thesis, she examines the relationship between sustainability standards and sustainable competitive strategies and demonstrates how standards contribute to a successful business.

Claudia has been involved in the field of sustainable textiles, focusing on organic, since 2005. Among other activities, she worked as a consultant and has been editor of the b2b sustainable textiles magazine “natürlich natur”. Until recently, she served as board member responsible for marketing with IVN, the Germany based member organization of the GOTS International Working Group.

In her position, Claudia is responsible for the implementation of the GOTS marketing project, including the work of the GOTS Regional  Representatives presently active in North America, Scandinavia, Great Britain, Australia/New Zealand, Japan, India, and China. Claudia simultaneously continues to serve as Regional Representative for the German speaking countries.

The GOTS Management now consists of GOTS Technical Director Marcus Bruegel, GOTS Marketing Director Claudia Kersten and GOTS Managing Director and IWG Coordinator Herbert Ladwig.

 

Discussion Highlights 

 

Links to Further Reading

The Business Case For Being A Responsible Business, published in 2011 by The Doughty Centre for Corporate Responsibility at Cranfield University and Business in the Community http://www.som.cranfield.ac.uk/som/dinamic-content/media/documents/Business%20case%20final.pdf

The ISEAL 100 Survey: Business and Certification Beyond the Tipping Point http://www.isealalliance.org/online-community/news/theiseal-100-survey-business-and-certification-beyond-the-tipping-point

"Improving smallholder livelihoods: Effectiveness of certification in coffee, cocoa and cotton,” a report looking at the effectiveness of sustainability standards at improving living conditions and sustainable development in rural areas. (2013)

KPMG Sustainability (commissioned by SUSTAINEO) http://www.sustaineo.org/news-reader-en/items/study-on-the-effectiveness-ofcertifications-now-online.html

Dyllick, T./Belz, F./Schneidewind U. (1997): Ökologie und Wettbwerbsfähigkeit, Carl Hanser Verlag München Wien

Petersen, H./Klewitz, J./Schock, M. (2012): Zertifikate und Label zur Gewährleistung von Umwelt und Sozialstandards; Inputpapier ausgearbeitet für die Teilnehmer/innen des Innovationsverbundes Nachhaltiger Mittelstand Centre for Sustainability Management (CSM)

Schaltegger, S./Dyllick T. (Hrsg.) (2002): Nachhaltig managen mit der Balanced Scorecard, Konzepte und Fallstudien, Gabler Verlag, Wiesbaden